New ILO project to combat unacceptable forms of work in the Thai fishing and seafood industry

ILO

ILO, in partnership with Thailand’s Ministry of Labour and the Delegation of the European Union to Thailand, is launching a new project to combat unacceptable forms of work in the Thai fishing and seafood industry.

BANGKOK – The International Labour Organization (ILO), in partnership with Thailand’s Ministry of Labour and the Delegation of the European Union to Thailand, is launching a new project, “Combatting Unacceptable Forms of Work in the Thai Fishing and Seafood Industry”, on 17 March 2016, in Bangkok.

The 42-month project is funded by the European Union  (EU) and the ILO. It aims to address working conditions that deny fundamental principles and rights at work in the Thai fishing and seafood processing industry.

“We are eager to get started and work with all partners to transform an industry which today is associated with unacceptable forms of work – to an industry associated with social justice and decent work. The project is about tackling forced labour and child labour and going beyond. At its heart, is an emphasis on dignity – the essential feature of decent work,” said Mr Maurizio Bussi, Director of the ILO Country Office for Thailand, Cambodia and Lao People’s Democratic Republic.

A range of mutually reinforcing methods will be utilised to tackle unacceptable forms of work, especially forced labour and child labour, and to reduce and prevent the exploitation of workers, many of whom are migrant and in certain cases exposed to trafficking risks. These include enhancing Thailand’s legal and regulatory framework in line with international labour standards, strengthening effective law enforcement on land and at sea, improving compliance through voluntary private sector initiatives, working with buyers in Europe, North America and Oceania as well as empowering workers and increasing their access to support services. The issues of gender equality, good governance, private sector engagement and environment will cut across project strategies.

“We are committed to firmly supporting the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, leaving no one behind. We are concerned that many victims of forced or child labour have no voice and no possibility to escape from extreme working conditions. We welcome the firm commitment of the Thai government to move ahead and address the issue with determination. The programme will help Thailand comply with International Labour Standards,” said Ambassador Jesus Sanz, Head of the Delegation of the EU in Thailand.

“I believe that to solve these problems, success can only be achieved through cooperation. The launching ceremony, held at the Ministry of Labour, marks closer cooperation and constructive engagement between the Royal Thai Government, Thai workers’ and employers’ organizations, the private sector and civil society organizations, in working together to combat unacceptable forms of work in the Thai fishing and seafood industry,” said General Sirichai Ditthakul, Minister of Labour, Thailand.

 

Source: ILO

http://www.ilo.org/asia/info/public/pr/WCMS_460488/lang–en/index.htm